Becoming slaves to our own desires. Luke Gallagher recalls the first time that he knew he wanted to become a teacher.

As I sit in Bloomfield Restaurant having a latte with my grandparents, I cannot but reflect on my previous blog. Perhaps due to the fact that I am on holidays, I have had more time to relate my previous writing to my current situation.

Previously, I argued that my role as a primary P.E Specialist was the tip of the iceberg, as I suggested that a world of opportunities would unravel from the experience. As a result I focused on developing some of my personal achievements for the future such as: completing first aid and rugby qualifications and coaching rugby and cricket with Lions Sports Academy and Teddington Cricket Club respectively.

Although, these experiences added value to my character, I realised that I was beginning to lose sight of why I wanted to become a Physical Education teacher in the first place. It was almost as if I was working towards achieving a title rather than developing my characteristics and my ability to perform the duties of a P.E teacher to the best of my ability. By reflecting on this hypothesis, I wanted to get back to basics and get a firm understanding of the real reason why I decided to become a teacher.

When I was nine years old, I went on holidays with my parents, sister and grandparents. Each day consisted of multiple activities: having breakfast; swimming in the pool; going on excursions; eating out in restaurants. However, I will never forget one specific activity. The image of my granddad teaching me how to play pool.

Whilst playing pool with my grandad, I was fascinated by his ability to change my interest and develop it into a passion for playing the game. This experience became one of the most pivotal moments in my life, as it made me realise that I wanted to imitate my grandad’s actions and become a catalyst in developing each child’s passion for taking part in physical activity and sport for the future.

Sometimes individuals such as myself lose sight of what is important in life. We get so caught up in our work that we are blinded and become ‘slaves to our own desires.’ However, by going back to my educational roots and reflecting on the reason why I wanted to teach, it is evident that sometimes it is important for me to stop and reflect on my past goals in order for me to live in the present moment.

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